Lindesnes fyr – the southernmost point in Norway

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph.

All real Norway vacationers want to go to the North Cape. Few people know that the South Cape in Norway has its own special charm. We are here and find that this place is in no way inferior to the North Cape.

Lindesnes fyr – the southernmost point in Norway

The Lindesnes fyr is arguably the southernmost Norwegian lighthouse on the mainland. Images on many calendars have made him a small celebrity and not only Landstrasse 44 is one of the most beautiful holiday routes in Norway, the lighthouse Lindesnes fyr is one of the places where you can only fall in love.

On the southern Skogfjordvejen, a well-developed road, we turn south at Vigeland on road 460. The descent is hard to miss, in the middle of the roundabout in Vigeland you will find the red and white lighthouse, but as a model of the southern original. From here it is the next 28 kilometers mostly along the nearby North Sea coast, past many a small fishing village that is tempting to stop. You have to decide if you want to go to other destinations in Norway like we are planning to do.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

The lighthouse Lindesnes fyr is firmly planned, which attracts crowds of tourists in the high season. Around 100,000 people are expected again this year. We are here outside of the hustle and bustle and are already enchanted by this lively and original landscape, the rough coast shaped by wind and waves and of course the red and white lighthouse Lindesnes fyr. So here is the South Cape of Norway.

Souvenir, souvenir, souvenir and a cafe in the rock hall

A small machine house and the apartments of the lighthouse keepers are of course not missing. Once again, the art of architecture in Norway becomes visible, which repeatedly combines rugged nature, tradition and modernity in an impressive way. In this case in the rock hall with its south-facing glass facade, actually built into the rock in the north.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

Already in 2004 the area was converted into a Lindesnes fyr lighthouse museum, after all Norway’s first beacon was built at this location, but more on that later.

At this place there is everything that can be associated with a lighthouse – exhibitions in the individual buildings, a museum shop, a small café and of course a tour of the lighthouse with a magnificent view.

Actually there are two beacons here, because the predecessor from 1822, who served here until 1915, is in the immediate vicinity. Then he was replaced by today’s lighthouse Lindesnes fyr.

The whole history of the lighthouse Lindesnes fyr

The merchant ships used the numerous natural harbors along the Norwegian coast as early as the Middle Ages. The sea can be extremely rough in this area and has since been one of the most important sea routes in Northern Europe. Ships keep sinking at the connection between Skagerak and the North Sea because they run onto the many small rocks. The area around Lindesnes is both notorious for seafarers as a dangerous sea area and popular as a protective headland.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

The first Norwegian beacon in Lindesnes

At that time parts of Norway were under Danish influence. And so it was the Danish King Fredrik III who allowed a beacon on Lindesnes on July 18, 1655. The operation was financed from the port tax between the Swedish Bohuslän and the Norwegian mountains. The following autumn it was supposed to go into operation and so four ships were sent out to bring building materials and coal. But the journeys were disproportionately long and so the decision was initially taken to take a temporary solution.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

A wooden tower with three levels was built, lead glass was placed in the walls and 30 candles lit. But the light was too weak to be noticed at all in poor visibility. So the original planned coal fire was used, but this light could not be seen far enough either. This meant that the first beacon on Lindesnes had failed and its setting was sealed after only one year of operation.

The second beacon on Lindesnes

69 years and many shipwrecks later, the second beacon was started on February 1st, 1725. This time it consisted of two coal fires, the second was placed further west in Makoy. So a mix-up with the beacon in Skagen in Denmark was impossible. The two beacons, however, consumed tons of coal because they each consisted of open fire pots that were installed on the rocks.

The third beacon on Lindesnes

The operation of the two nearby beacons in Lindesnes and Makoy was sometime out of date, the seafarers had reported on their voyages of further developments and so a new and modern beacon was built in Lindesnes. From 1822, the coal fires were now in closed systems, which saved considerable fuel. To do this, solid foundations were built with closed lanterns and smoke vents to improve the clarity of the light.

In 1844, the Lindesnes fyr beacon in Makoy was demolished and a projection lens was inserted into the glazing of the Lindesnes beacon for the first time, which would concentrate the light and carry it further out to sea. Immediately from 1854 onwards, a paraffin-fired lamp was used and from then on coal operation could be dispensed with. After all, the coal had been laboriously shipped from England.

Today’s beacon Lindesnes fyr

The Lindesnes fyr lighthouse found today went into operation in 1915. First, the cast iron tower was built in parallel and then the lens previously used was removed from the old fire and integrated here. The machine house was added only five years later, and a beacon was added to the beacon.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph.

Lindesnes fyr, norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica Elmarit M 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

There were lighthouse keepers on Lindesnes fyr until 2003, when operations in the Lindesnes fyr lighthouse were automated. However, a foundation was founded in 1992 in order to preserve Lindesnes fyr for posterity and to open it to visitors.

Since 2004, the Lindesnes fyr lighthouse, with its predecessor from 1882, which has also been preserved, has been the first lighthouse museum and the main national center for the national lighthouse museum.

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