Dream roads in Norway – Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph.

The Atlantic Road in Norway counts as Atlanterhavveien one of the most beautiful motorways in the world. For a long time we wanted to discover this route, today the time has come. We start north of Ålesund on one of Norway’s most impressive landscape routes, leaving only the time pressure behind us.

Dream roads in Norway – Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien

Norway has a coastline of 25,148 kilometers on the mainland. Our journey along the coast alone will be about 12,000 kilometers. Many connections lead via ferries, tunnels or bridges. The Norwegian Atlantic Road with the official name Atlanterhavsveien proves that Norwgen’s roads are not just traffic routes, but architectural art.

The route of the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph.

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

The Norwegian landscape route Atlanterhavsveien is located between the beautiful Art Nouveau town of Ålesund and the northern Kristiansund.

Even the approach to the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien is an own experience. From Ålesund we orient ourselves towards Molde and drive over the remote country road through green and almost secluded landscapes on the road 664 to the small picturesque fishing village of Bud. The quite strong crosswind tells us in advance our proximity to the sea. The small symbols of the landscape route confirm us to be on the right track to the world-famous Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien in all seclusion.

The historic fishing village Bud

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph.

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

Arrived in Bud we can hardly expect the settlement with the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien, but it would be a pity to leave this small historic fishing village Bud left. After all, Bud was the largest trading center between Trondheim and Kristiansund in the 16th and 17th centuries. What remains is the charm of this picturesque village of Bud, which is also the beginning of the discovery of the breathtaking Atlantic Road / Atlantikhavsveien. It is therefore worth considering the campsite and spend a night at this place. Because Bud has nice cafes and fish restaurants, but also great places for bird watching or hike.

We are drawn to the 160 meter high Gulberget, which is easy to reach with a relaxed walk. The view lets us take root, because the place Bud itself, but also the view of the sea with the islands Bjørnsund and Ona is indescribable.

The Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph.

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

From Bud we follow the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien along its 36 kilometers to Kårvåg. That the route of the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien runs only up to 30 meters above sea level, underlines the intensity with the environment of the Atlantic. The actual part of the Atlantikstraße / Atlanterhavsveien leads on a length of 8,274 meters through the bizarre coastal landscape of Norway.

It goes over six bridges and numerous small quaint islands. Again and again there are stops, viewpoints and fishing bridges.

At the end, it is under water, through the tolled Atlantic tunnel in the direction of Kristiansund.

Whether sun or wind and clouds, the Atlanterhavsveien is an incomparable experience at all times and seduces us time and again to stop, alight, stay. A special experience is this stage with the bike or convertible.

The history of the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph.

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

The area between Ålesund and Kristiansund has always been famous for its abundance of fish. So the families partly had their little houses and sheds on the equally small islands.
The nets were full and now had to be distributed laboriously to the markets in the cities. But the Norwegian coast is very rugged and dangerous. The waters in this region are still among the most treacherous in Norway.

So it is hardly surprising that the people on the island Averøy needed better transport routes for their catch and longed for a solid connection. Early on, they had actually considered building a railway line in this area. However, such plans were finally shelved in 1935, and the automobile seemed to assert itself inexorably. It was not until the 1970s that the idea of ​​linking the archipelago to Averøy was taken up again and after long planning on 1 August 1983 laid the foundation for one of the most beautiful landscape routes in the world, the Atlantic Road and the Atlanterhavsveien.

Building a road through the Atlantic sounds easier than it really is. Alone during the construction period, there were 12 hurricanes here. But after six years, the Atlanterhavvegen was opened on 7 July 1989 and is still considered one of the most important buildings of the 20th century. In 2005, the Atlanterhavsveien was then officially named the building of the 20th century. Incidentally, the Guardian sees the most beautiful car route in the world on the Atlantic Road in Norway.

Viewpoint Kjeksa

Another and at first inconspicuous detail of the Atlanterhavsveien is the viewpoint Kjeksa. For a long time I worked in the architectural field and designed rooms. But again and again I am fascinated by the idea, by the momentum, by the sketch of an architect who creates ideas in a very idiosyncratic way and yet in harmony with the surrounding landscape creates details that one must first come to.

The small vantage point Kjeksa with its landscape furniture and its everyday concrete way to the sea looks exactly the same.

As calm and relaxed as the small resting place and viewpoint Kjeksa at this point also works, so demanding and notorious is the sea lying in front of him. Here we look at one of the most dangerous sea areas in Norway.

But as long as we are not at sea, we can enjoy the beach, which leads over the concrete path and some stairs at the foot of Atlanterhavsveien to the small beach with its scattered fishing spots.


Viewpoint Askevågen

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph.

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

Askevågen vantage point is the smallest vantage point on the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien. Wheelchair users will only be able to view Askevågen from the outside. He looks like a small glazed pulpit to the Atlantic Ocean and gives for a moment the feeling of being in the middle, in the Atlantic off the Norwegian coast.

Not only the impressive panorama of the sea and the archipelago or the mountainous environment on the mainland around the Atlanterhavsveien is impressive, but also the viewpoint Askevågen as one of the many details of the Atlanterhavsveien itself.


Myrbærholmbrua / Myrbærholm-bridge

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph.

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

The Myrbærholmbrua is probably one of the most visited fishing bridges ever. It is also one of the seven road bridges of the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien and was from the beginning, especially with the locals very popular as an excellent fishing area. Because of the current of the tides, there is a great chance to pull mackerel, pollack, saithe or a cod out of the water.

Now, however, it was too dangerous for anglers to throw their routes to the sea on the busy road. In 2005, for example, the Atlanterhavsveien was supplemented on both sides by the Angler-bridges.

Die Storseisundbrua / Storeisund-bridge

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph.

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

It is probably the most impressive and perhaps the most striking structure along the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien. The Storseisundbridge is the largest of the seven bridges of the Atlanterhavsveien and connects the islands Averøy and Eide. It is also the landmark of the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien.

Resting place Eldhusøya

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph.

Atlanterhavsveien Norge, Kodak Ektar, Leica M Elmarit 2.8 28 asph. | © mare.photo

Eldhusøya is one of the rest areas, whose toilets are open throughout. Add to that in the summer months the small café with the glittering facade and the small windows that are reminiscent of a herring swarm.

A curved path, covered with gratings, leads through the vegetation of the archipelago along the Atlantic Road / Atlanterhavsveien.

Island Geitøya

Geitøya is easily accessible and offers from its surveys a dreamlike panorama on the seemingly endless skerries along the Atlanterhavsveien. Under the Geitøy bridge is about two to three meters above the Atlantic, an ideal fishing spot, the tide provides the flow here for an undreamt of fish wealth. From the parking lot a fishing pier leads here.

A jetty brings guests from here to the small fishing island Håholmen. In this small fishing village Håholmen, which can only be reached by boat, we feel a bit dated back to the 18th century, everything is still preserved in its original condition.

Håholmen is about five hectares large, with almost 30 historic buildings from the typical boat and residential houses almost everything that an idyllic village so needs. A bakery provides us with a small selection of baked goods here and in the equally manageable film screening room of the Saga Siglar-Halle one has an incomparable cinema enjoyment. To the west side of the island is the open sea with its fairway, which is regularly traversed by the Hurtigruten. Today’s Håholmen Island is worth a visit, the romantic hotel on Håholmen will ensure a memorable stay on Håholmen.

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